Autor: UNOi

Fecha: 27 de julio de 2015

Get ready for the next school year

by Elaine Gallagher Hi teachers! If you are like many teachers, even though you are eager for summer vacation, you are already thinking of how […]

Elaine Gallagher 00 cegby Elaine Gallagher

Hi teachers!

If you are like many teachers, even though you are eager for summer vacation, you are already thinking of how to improve your techniques for the next school year. Here are two checklists to help you monitor and strengthen your classroom management skills.

#1. Behavior Management Checklist  

(Teacher: You can be supported by UNO’s “Assertive Discipline” course.  Ask your coach.)  

Directions:

Consider each of the recommendations below and rate yourself as “S” (skilled in that area) or “N” (needs improvement). Use those items with an “N” rating to set goals for professional growth. While there are always exceptions to these guidelines, one should be able to justify variations as they benefit the student.

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_____ 1. I have a comprehensive behavior management plan which includes: positively stated rules that tell what to do, rules which are not redundant or copies of school rules, a listing of consequences proceeding from mild penalties, and ways to thank students for displaying appropriate behavior.

_____ 2. My rules are posted in a prominent place in my room.

_____ 3. I have submitted my plan to my administrator so he/she will support me when I have reached the last step of my consequence list.

_____4. Parents have a copy of my discipline plan.

_____ 5. I CONSISTENTLY enforce rules by moving through the consequences.

_____ 6. I do not allow myself to be intimidated by certain students into not disciplining them.

_____ 7. I address all misbehavior.

_____ 8. I constantly watch for opportunities to positively react to students who are    behaving.

_____ 8. I am a good role model for courteous and respectful behavior.

_____ 10. I am in control of my emotions when disciplining.

_____ 11. I NEVER yell at students.

_____ 12. I use respectful terminology when disciplining my students.

_____ 13. I use a calm, firm, respectful tone of voice when administering consequences.

_____ 14. I see the humor in situations and enjoy laughing with my students.

 _____ 15. I never nag or lecture students who have misbehaved.

_____ 16. I never plead with students to behave.

_____ 17. When a student is misbehaving, I give him/her a clear, firm direction to do something (e.g. “Open your book to page 67.” “Please go to your seat now.”) or I ask, “What should you be doing right now?” (If she/he doesn’t know, I tell him/her calmly.)

_____ 18. If my direction is not followed, I administer the first consequence from my list. I continue through the list until I gain compliance.

_____ 19. I am organized and prepared for each class.

_____ 20. I have routines for dismissal, assignment submission, pencil sharpening, bathroom use, asking questions, lining up, etc.

_____ 21. My lessons are well-paced.

_____ 22. I vary my teaching methods. I do more than give out worksheets and ask Ss to copy questions from a text.

_____ 23. My lessons are interesting in order to motivate students. The lessons are student centered and use a variety of multi-media, hands-on activities, co-operative learning, and technology.

_____ 24. I seek new teaching ideas and positive ways to manage behavior.

_____ 25. I have set goals for myself in the area of using positive ways to promote appropriate student behavior.

_____ 26. I have at least one colleague with whom I can share ideas on and go to when I need help with behavior management.

 

#2. CHECKLIST:  Managing Students

Another tool to help me manage my students is this checklist:

For #’s 1 – 13, “YES” Is better.

  1. I develop and teach rules in the first week of school.
  2. Rules are stated positively telling students what to do.
  3. Rules are posted in a prominent place in my room.
  4. I have submitted my plan to my administrator for his/her support.
  5. Parents have a copy of my discipline plan.?6. I distinguish rules from procedures in my classroom.
  6. I involve students in the development of the classroom rules.
  7. I send home a copy of the classroom rules for parents to see and sign.
  8. I engage students in role-playing what classroom rules should look like in our classroom.
  9. I teach lessons on procedures, including lots of practice, in the first weeks of school.
  10. Major procedures are followed without my constant prompting (for example, student talk, equipment use).
  11. I am consistent in my expectations and reinforcement of rules and procedures.
  12. I constantly watch for opportunities to positively react to students who are following rules and procedures.

 

For #’s 14 – 19, “NO” Is Better.

  1. There are some student misbehaviors occurring that aren’t covered by current rules.
  2. I have stopped enforcing one or more of the classroom rules.
  3. I find myself giving the same directions over and over for common procedures.
  4. I spend as much time going over directions later in the year as at the beginning of the year.
  5. There are some students who have an especially hard time following the rules and procedures.
  6. I allow myself to be intimidated by certain students into not disciplining them.

 

For #’s 20 – 32, “YES” Is better.

  1. The rewards and punishments I use take no time or focus away from the academic lesson.
  2. I reward good student behavior, including effort, in a variety of ways.
  3. My praise of students is specific.
  4. I am in control of my emotions when disciplining.
  5. I never yell at students.
  6. I use a calm, firm, and respectful tone of voice when administering consequences.
  7. The punishments I use with students are effective – I do not have repeat offenders.
  8. The punishments I use are fair – I would be willing to have any of them used on me.
  9. I teach students step-by-step how to do a desired behavior.
  10. I provide students with ways to monitor their own behavior.
  11. I investigate possible causes of misbehavior.
  12. I nip misbehavior in the bud in ways that take no time away from the lesson.
  13. I nip misbehavior in the bud in ways that keep a positive classroom climate.

For #’s 33 – 34, “NO” Is better.

  1. Some students ignore behavior corrections.
  2. I warn and threaten and fail to follow through when misbehavior continues.

For #’s 35 – 38, “YES” Is better.

  1. I use a variety of instructional methods.
  2. My lessons are student-centered and include a?mix of visual, auditory, and kinesthetic lesson activities.
  3. I and my materials are ready to begin, and lessons start promptly.
  4. During a given lesson or class period,?I walk throughout the room and bring each student into my physical proximity.

For #’s 39 – 42, “NO” Is better.

  1. Student attention tends to fade before I finish conducting a lesson.
  2. I run out of class time before covering the major concepts planned in a lesson.
  3. Student attention tends to fade before students finish independent or group work.
  4. Some students finish quickly, run out of things to do, and bother others.

For #’s 43 – 47, “YES” Is better.

  1. I am a good role model for courteous and respectful behavior.
  2. I see the humor in situations and enjoy laughing with my students.
  3. I seek new teaching ideas and positive ways to manage behavior.
  4. I have set goals for myself in the area of using positive methods to promote appropriate student behavior.
  5. I have at least one colleague with whom I can share ?ideas and go to when I need help with behavior management.

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Using these two checklists, answering, YES, NO, or SOMETIMES, or S for Skilled, or N for Needs improvement, will help you to become aware of what behaviors you’ll need to strengthen or which ones will need to be eliminated in your classroom next school year.

A good teacher ALWAYS works on self-improvement, even after 50 years in the classroom!

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